Bash's vi command line editing mode

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Bash's vi command line editing mode

Ven Tadipatri
Hi,
   This may sound like a real newbie question, but when I do the "set -o vi" 
in the bash command line shell, if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line,
it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise
the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the command.
  Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really powerful/dangerous/unnecessary
command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute the
command. How do I do this?
  :q! doesn't seem to work, as the command still runs. :wq , well, I don't want
to save anything, I just want to get out of the editor and return to the plain
old bash prompt.
   Is this possible? Of course I can always kill the terminal that I'm running
in to avoid running the command as soon as vi exits. Or I can try to press
ctrl+C as fast as possible.
   I was hoping for a better alternative.

Please help.
Thanks,
Ven

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Ven Tadipatri
Well...duh..there's an easy fix for this. Just prefix the command with '#'
Then hit :wq to save it and "run" it. Still...why does it behave this way?
Shouldn't I be able to choose not to run the command when I exit
from Bash's vi editing mode?
   This is on a Centos 5 machine, and the terminal is a Gnome terminal.

Thanks,
Ven

On Fri, Mar 23, 2012 at 11:05 AM, Ven Tadipatri <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,
   This may sound like a real newbie question, but when I do the "set -o vi" 
in the bash command line shell, if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line,
it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise
the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the command.
  Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really powerful/dangerous/unnecessary
command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute the
command. How do I do this?
  :q! doesn't seem to work, as the command still runs. :wq , well, I don't want
to save anything, I just want to get out of the editor and return to the plain
old bash prompt.
   Is this possible? Of course I can always kill the terminal that I'm running
in to avoid running the command as soon as vi exits. Or I can try to press
ctrl+C as fast as possible.
   I was hoping for a better alternative.

Please help.
Thanks,
Ven

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Taylor Hedberg
In reply to this post by Ven Tadipatri
You want the :cq command, which causes vim to exit with non-zero status.
This makes the shell think something went wrong with the editor, so it
won't execute the command.

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Gary Johnson-4
In reply to this post by Ven Tadipatri
On 2012-03-23, Ven Tadipatri wrote:

> Hi,
>    This may sound like a real newbie question, but when I do the "set -o vi"
> in the bash command line shell, if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line,
> it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise
> the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the command.
>   Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really powerful/dangerous/unnecessary
> command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute the
> command. How do I do this?
>   :q! doesn't seem to work, as the command still runs. :wq , well, I don't want
> to save anything, I just want to get out of the editor and return to the plain
> old bash prompt.
>    Is this possible? Of course I can always kill the terminal that I'm running
> in to avoid running the command as soon as vi exits. Or I can try to press
> ctrl+C as fast as possible.
>    I was hoping for a better alternative.

One way is to exit vim with the :cq command.  See

    :help :cq

That will quit vim with an error code telling bash that the editing
was unsuccessful.

Another is to delete the contents of the vim buffer before saving
and quitting as normal, e.g., dd if there is only one line in the
buffer or ggdG to if there is more than one line, followed by ZZ or
:wq to save and quit.

In this case, you _do_ want to save something because that something
is what bash will execute.

I usually use dd:wq because the :w makes me feel more sure that
the empty buffer has actually been written.

Regards,
Gary

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Christian Brabandt
In reply to this post by Ven Tadipatri
Hi Ven!

On Fr, 23 Mär 2012, Ven Tadipatri wrote:

> Hi,
>    This may sound like a real newbie question, but when I do the "set -o
> vi"
> in the bash command line shell, if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line,
> it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise
> the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the
> command.
>   Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really
> powerful/dangerous/unnecessary
> command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute
> the
> command. How do I do this?
>   :q! doesn't seem to work, as the command still runs. :wq , well, I don't
> want
> to save anything, I just want to get out of the editor and return to the

Actually, :q! should work and always did for me.
I would guess, that bash only executes the file, if it's timestamp has
been changed. May be some plugin that sets an WriteCmd autocmd or
something?

Mit freundlichen Grüßen
Christian
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  Don Erstag

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Andrei Kulakov
In reply to this post by Gary Johnson-4
On 03/23/2012 11:26 AM, Gary Johnson wrote:

> On 2012-03-23, Ven Tadipatri wrote:
>> Hi,
>>     This may sound like a real newbie question, but when I do the "set -o vi"
>> in the bash command line shell, if I hit<Esc>  and v on the command line,
>> it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise
>> the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the command.
>>    Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really powerful/dangerous/unnecessary
>> command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute the
>> command. How do I do this?
>>    :q! doesn't seem to work, as the command still runs. :wq , well, I don't want
>> to save anything, I just want to get out of the editor and return to the plain
>> old bash prompt.
>>     Is this possible? Of course I can always kill the terminal that I'm running
>> in to avoid running the command as soon as vi exits. Or I can try to press
>> ctrl+C as fast as possible.
>>     I was hoping for a better alternative.
>
> One way is to exit vim with the :cq command.  See
>
>      :help :cq
>
> That will quit vim with an error code telling bash that the editing
> was unsuccessful.
>
> Another is to delete the contents of the vim buffer before saving
> and quitting as normal, e.g., dd if there is only one line in the
> buffer or ggdG to if there is more than one line, followed by ZZ or
> :wq to save and quit.
>
> In this case, you _do_ want to save something because that something
> is what bash will execute.
>
> I usually use dd:wq because the :w makes me feel more sure that
> the empty buffer has actually been written.
>
> Regards,
> Gary
>



I always ddZZ and I think it's the best approach because this is
not something you might use often and remembering a special :cq
for it makes no sense because everybody knows dd and it works
perfectly well for this use case.

I like it better than :q! because it's easier to type, because
I hardly ever use :q! and dd is more visually explicit, i.e.
you can see "this is what will get executed - nothing", with
:q! I think if I take a longer time to edit the command, I
might save it accidentally as I'm working on it, and then
exiting will run the saved version.

I also use the same dd command when I edit the regular command
line and then decide I don't want to run it.

  -ak

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

John Little-4
In reply to this post by Ven Tadipatri
On Saturday, March 24, 2012 4:05:34 AM UTC+13, vtadipatri wrote:
> ... when I do the "set -o vi" in the bash command line shell, if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line, it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the command.    Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really powerful/dangerous/unnecessary command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute the command.

If it really is dangerous, I empty the buffer with ggVGd, in case something has slipped off the top of the screen.

BTW, you don't need set -o vi to be able to invoke vim on bash's command line. Even with set -o emacs, "fc" starts vim for me, (because my /usr/bin/editor is linked to /etc/alternatives/editor which links to /usr/bin/vim.gtk), as does <ctrl-x><ctrl-e>.  Hmm, I think I'll export EDITOR="gvim -f"  in my .bashrc to get my vim version and also be able to copy and paste from the terminal window.

Also set -o vi enables a lot of simple vi-like stuff (f.ex., <esc> kkkk gets you to the fourth previous command).  

Regards, John

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Andrei Kulakov
On 03/23/2012 08:21 PM, John Little wrote:
> Also set -o vi enables a lot of simple vi-like stuff (f.ex.,<esc>  kkkk gets you to the fourth previous command).
>
> Regards, John


Numbered commands like 4k work too, of course. I use 2k very often, but
I don't think I ever use higher numbers than that.  -ak

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Ven Tadipatri
In reply to this post by Christian Brabandt
Hi Christian,
   For some reason :q! doesn't work for me. I tried the :cq that Gary & Taylor suggested, and it 
worked perfectly.
   It looks like I can also delete the lines, then save the buffer with :wq and that works too.  
You're right-it looks like bash just executes the file with the timestamp changes, so if I 
save a blank file, then nothing happens.
   There's a lot you can do on the command line with "set -o vi", 
but sometimes it's nice to just be able to go into vim and be able to edit there, using
buffers, etc. 
   For now, I think I'll stick with :cq. Thanks for the advice everybody!

-Ven
    
On Fri, Mar 23, 2012 at 12:16 PM, Christian Brabandt <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi Ven!

On Fr, 23 Mär 2012, Ven Tadipatri wrote:

> Hi,
>    This may sound like a real newbie question, but when I do the "set -o
> vi"
> in the bash command line shell, if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line,
> it goes into vi editing mode. This is kind of cool, as I can exercise
> the full editing power of vi, and when I exit the editor it runs the
> command.
>   Unfortunately, sometimes I may have a really
> powerful/dangerous/unnecessary
> command that I've typed, and all I want to do is just cancel, not execute
> the
> command. How do I do this?
>   :q! doesn't seem to work, as the command still runs. :wq , well, I don't
> want
> to save anything, I just want to get out of the editor and return to the

Actually, :q! should work and always did for me.
I would guess, that bash only executes the file, if it's timestamp has
been changed. May be some plugin that sets an WriteCmd autocmd or
something?

Mit freundlichen Grüßen
Christian
--
Wie man sein Kind nicht nennen sollte:
 Don Erstag



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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Charles Campbell
In reply to this post by Ven Tadipatri
Ven Tadipatri wrote:
> Well...duh..there's an easy fix for this. Just prefix the command with '#'
> Then hit :wq to save it and "run" it. Still...why does it behave this
> way?
> Shouldn't I be able to choose not to run the command when I exit
> from Bash's vi editing mode?
>    This is on a Centos 5 machine, and the terminal is a Gnome terminal.
>
It looks like several of the answers presume you're using vim/gvim
rather than the bash shell's vi-mode (ie. :cq, which doesn't work under
bash shell).  Assuming that you actually meant to ask what should you
type while in the shell, not while in vim:

Try    0D

(move cursor to beginning of line, delete contents from cursor to
end-ofline)

Regards,
Chip Campbell

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Andrei Kulakov
On 03/27/2012 12:03 PM, Charles Campbell wrote:

> Ven Tadipatri wrote:
>> Well...duh..there's an easy fix for this. Just prefix the command with
>> '#'
>> Then hit :wq to save it and "run" it. Still...why does it behave this
>> way?
>> Shouldn't I be able to choose not to run the command when I exit
>> from Bash's vi editing mode?
>> This is on a Centos 5 machine, and the terminal is a Gnome terminal.
>>
> It looks like several of the answers presume you're using vim/gvim
> rather than the bash shell's vi-mode (ie. :cq, which doesn't work under
> bash shell). Assuming that you actually meant to ask what should you
> type while in the shell, not while in vim:
>
> Try 0D
>
> (move cursor to beginning of line, delete contents from cursor to
> end-ofline)
>
> Regards,
> Chip Campbell
>


I think dd is easier. The OP said, though, that he is talking about
vim launched from command line.  -ak

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Charles Campbell
AK wrote:

> On 03/27/2012 12:03 PM, Charles Campbell wrote:
>> Ven Tadipatri wrote:
>>> Well...duh..there's an easy fix for this. Just prefix the command with
>>> '#'
>>> Then hit :wq to save it and "run" it. Still...why does it behave this
>>> way?
>>> Shouldn't I be able to choose not to run the command when I exit
>>> from Bash's vi editing mode?
>>> This is on a Centos 5 machine, and the terminal is a Gnome terminal.
>>>
>> It looks like several of the answers presume you're using vim/gvim
>> rather than the bash shell's vi-mode (ie. :cq, which doesn't work under
>> bash shell). Assuming that you actually meant to ask what should you
>> type while in the shell, not while in vim:
>>
>> Try 0D
>>
>> (move cursor to beginning of line, delete contents from cursor to
>> end-ofline)
>>
>> Regards,
>> Chip Campbell
>>
>
>
> I think dd is easier, too.  The OP said, though, that he is talking about
> vim launched from command line.  -ak
Yes, dd will also work; and I agree that its easier to type.

I'm afraid that I've looked over the OP's first two messages and don't
see where vim was launched, though:

Title:  Bash's vi command line editing mode
Excerpt: ...but when I do the "set -o vi" in the bash command line shell,...
Excerpt: ...if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line, it goes into vi
editing mode...
Excerpt: ...when I exit the editor it runs the command...  (when one
exits Vim, typically it doesn't cause any commands to run)

Regards,
Chip Campbell


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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Andrei Kulakov
On 03/27/2012 12:27 PM, Charles Campbell wrote:

> AK wrote:
>> On 03/27/2012 12:03 PM, Charles Campbell wrote:
>>> Ven Tadipatri wrote:
>>>> Well...duh..there's an easy fix for this. Just prefix the command with
>>>> '#'
>>>> Then hit :wq to save it and "run" it. Still...why does it behave this
>>>> way?
>>>> Shouldn't I be able to choose not to run the command when I exit
>>>> from Bash's vi editing mode?
>>>> This is on a Centos 5 machine, and the terminal is a Gnome terminal.
>>>>
>>> It looks like several of the answers presume you're using vim/gvim
>>> rather than the bash shell's vi-mode (ie. :cq, which doesn't work under
>>> bash shell). Assuming that you actually meant to ask what should you
>>> type while in the shell, not while in vim:
>>>
>>> Try 0D
>>>
>>> (move cursor to beginning of line, delete contents from cursor to
>>> end-ofline)
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Chip Campbell
>>>
>>
>>
>> I think dd is easier, too. The OP said, though, that he is talking about
>> vim launched from command line. -ak
> Yes, dd will also work; and I agree that its easier to type.
>
> I'm afraid that I've looked over the OP's first two messages and don't
> see where vim was launched, though:
>
> Title: Bash's vi command line editing mode
> Excerpt: ...but when I do the "set -o vi" in the bash command line
> shell,...
> Excerpt: ...if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line, it goes into vi
> editing mode...
> Excerpt: ...when I exit the editor it runs the command... (when one
> exits Vim, typically it doesn't cause any commands to run)
>
> Regards,
> Chip Campbell


When you hit Esc and v in bash (or zsh), it does start the vim
editor, and when you exit it, it puts the buffer in command line,
it doesn't run it immediately but waits for you to press Enter.

  -ak

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Charles Campbell
AK wrote:
>
> When you hit Esc and v in bash (or zsh), it does start the vim
> editor, and when you exit it, it puts the buffer in command line,
> it doesn't run it immediately but waits for you to press Enter.
Ah, I see -- I usually use ksh (pdksh, actually) and it doesn't do that.

Regards,
Chip Campbell

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Gary Johnson-4
In reply to this post by Andrei Kulakov
On 2012-03-27, AK wrote:

> When you hit Esc and v in bash (or zsh), it does start the vim
> editor, and when you exit it, it puts the buffer in command line,
> it doesn't run it immediately but waits for you to press Enter.

It has never waited for me, using either ksh or bash--the shell has
always immediately executed the contents of the vim buffer as soon
as I exit vim.  I wonder if there is some shell option that controls
that.

Regards,
Gary

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Andrei Kulakov
On 03/27/2012 12:54 PM, Gary Johnson wrote:

> On 2012-03-27, AK wrote:
>
>> When you hit Esc and v in bash (or zsh), it does start the vim
>> editor, and when you exit it, it puts the buffer in command line,
>> it doesn't run it immediately but waits for you to press Enter.
>
> It has never waited for me, using either ksh or bash--the shell has
> always immediately executed the contents of the vim buffer as soon
> as I exit vim.  I wonder if there is some shell option that controls
> that.
>
> Regards,
> Gary
>


I actually use zsh, and that's what it does, I only assumed bash
does the same.  -ak

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Ven Tadipatri
In reply to this post by Charles Campbell
Hi Chip,
   Sorry for not being clear. I typed in a command from the bash shell, then launched vim by doing the <Esc> and v, which resulted in the command being put into vim. This is the part where I got stuck, because
it seemed like no matter what I did (:wq or :q!) it still executed the command when I exited vim.
   The solution was :cq, or alternatively, delete the command in the vim editor, but then rather than doing :q!, run :wq, so the blank command gets executed by Bash. 
   In my post I also tried to answer the questions some people were asking about why I couldn't do this 
directly on the command line, using the "set -o vi", and I was trying to explain how the vim editor (as opposed to the command line) gives you full access to all of vim's features (registers), whereas Bash's vi editing mode only allows for a small subset.  That and the fact that due to my own clumsiness, I accidentally find myself hitting <Esc> v and entering the vim editor sometimes when I don't want to.

Thanks,
Ven

On Tue, Mar 27, 2012 at 12:27 PM, Charles Campbell <[hidden email]> wrote:

I'm afraid that I've looked over the OP's first two messages and don't see where vim was launched, though:

Title:  Bash's vi command line editing mode
Excerpt: ...but when I do the "set -o vi" in the bash command line shell,...
Excerpt: ...if I hit <Esc> and v on the command line, it goes into vi editing mode...
Excerpt: ...when I exit the editor it runs the command...  (when one exits Vim, typically it doesn't cause any commands to run)

Regards,
Chip Campbell



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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Gilles Ruppert
I'm having the opposite problem:

I use vi mode with bash on OSX (10.9). As expected, <esc> v puts the current command into a buffer. However, when I :wq, the command is *not* executed.

Could there be a setting in .vimrc that causes this?

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Christian Brabandt
On Thu, November 7, 2013 12:58, Gilles Ruppert wrote:
> I'm having the opposite problem:
>
> I use vi mode with bash on OSX (10.9). As expected, <esc> v puts the
> current command into a buffer. However, when I :wq, the command is *not*
> executed.
>
> Could there be a setting in .vimrc that causes this?

Play with the backupcopy setting and possibly also with 'backup'
and 'writebackup' options.

regards,
Christian

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Re: Bash's vi command line editing mode

Tony Mechelynck
In reply to this post by Gilles Ruppert
On 07/11/13 12:58, Gilles Ruppert wrote:
> I'm having the opposite problem:
>
> I use vi mode with bash on OSX (10.9). As expected, <esc> v puts the current command into a buffer. However, when I :wq, the command is *not* executed.
>
> Could there be a setting in .vimrc that causes this?
>
I tried ESC v in bash, and to my surprise, the command-line was opened
in Vim as a file in /tmp/ with a name starting with "bash-fc-". My
.vimrc had been run, and in particular my colorscheme was set. After :wq
or even after :q! bash tried to execute the command (and complained,
because it was a nonsense command). However, the command which bash
tried to execute was the *unmodified* command-line, not the result of
any edits.

The following options (q.v.) set by my vimrc may be relevant:
nobackup
   writebackup
   backupcopy=auto

Indeed, setting 'backupcopy' to "no" on entry into this Vim editor made
edits to the command-line relevant (so that, e.g., after prefixing # to
the line bash treated it as a comment and did not complain).

Another thing that I notice is that on return from this Vim commnd-line
editor, Bash finds itself (apparently) in vim-like "normal mode" so that
letters typed at the keyboard in bash seem to have no effect until one
of them is a or i. Then bash "starts working again".


Best regards,
Tony.
--
"Wouldn't it be terrible if I quoted some reliable
  statistics which prove that more people are driven
  insane through religious hysteria than by drinking."
               [W. C. Fields]

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