Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

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Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

David Woodfall
I've noticed that when I select a block of text (written English
prose, not code) and press gq to reformat it, vim will change some of
the spaces after a period into two spaces, as is the convention among
some typists.

Is this intended, and can it be changed?

Personally, I prefer to keep just one space after a period, but I
notice that it does happen consistently - sometimes it will change
the spaces and sometimes not.

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Re: Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

Erik Christiansen
On 06.08.18 11:40, David Woodfall wrote:
> I've noticed that when I select a block of text (written English
> prose, not code) and press gq to reformat it, vim will change some of
> the spaces after a period into two spaces, as is the convention among
> some typists.
>
> Is this intended, and can it be changed?

AFAICT it's an Americanism, judging by occurrence. It defeats simplistic
automated removal of erroneous double spaces between words.

To turn it off, I have:

set nojoinspaces                 " Only one space when joining lines.

> Personally, I prefer to keep just one space after a period, but I
> notice that it does happen consistently - sometimes it will change
> the spaces and sometimes not.

Does your cpoptions include 'j'? If so, you'll only get one space after
'?' or '!'.

It's not a format taught here in Australia, at least not >50 years ago
when I was in primary school, and it's not found in the wild here since
either.

Erik

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Re: Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

meine van essen
In reply to this post by David Woodfall
On Mon, Aug 06, 2018 at 11:40:01AM +0100, David Woodfall wrote:
> I've noticed that when I select a block of text (written English
> prose, not code) and press gq to reformat it, vim will change some of
> the spaces after a period into two spaces, as is the convention among
> some typists.
>
> Is this intended, and can it be changed?

it could be to enhance formatting, eg. in Markdown. markdown uses two
spaces to force a new line, like <br> in html.

probably there is a way to change this setting, but I don't know it.

//meine

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Re: Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

David Woodfall
In reply to this post by Erik Christiansen
On Monday 6 August 2018 21:08,
Erik Christiansen <[hidden email]> put forth the proposition:

> On 06.08.18 11:40, David Woodfall wrote:
> > I've noticed that when I select a block of text (written English
> > prose, not code) and press gq to reformat it, vim will change some of
> > the spaces after a period into two spaces, as is the convention among
> > some typists.
> >
> > Is this intended, and can it be changed?
>
> AFAICT it's an Americanism, judging by occurrence. It defeats simplistic
> automated removal of erroneous double spaces between words.
>
> To turn it off, I have:
>
> set nojoinspaces                 " Only one space when joining lines.

Added

> > Personally, I prefer to keep just one space after a period, but I
> > notice that it does happen consistently - sometimes it will change
> > the spaces and sometimes not.
>
> Does your cpoptions include 'j'? If so, you'll only get one space after
> '?' or '!'.

Added j

> It's not a format taught here in Australia, at least not >50 years ago
> when I was in primary school, and it's not found in the wild here since
> either.

Thanks. I'll give those settings a shot.

--

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Re: Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

John Little-4
In reply to this post by Erik Christiansen
On 06.08.18 11:40, David Woodfall wrote:
> ... vim will change some of the spaces after a period into two spaces...

On Monday, August 6, 2018 at 11:08:12 PM UTC+12, Erik Christiansen replied:
> AFAICT it's an Americanism, judging by occurrence. It defeats simplistic
> automated removal of erroneous double spaces between words.

My understanding is that in print typesetting, more space was often used after a sentence than between words (though it could get complicated, depending on the font, the space needed for justification, and the first letter of the following sentence).  With typewriters, to mimic this, the practice of two spaces was adopted.  So, for text to be rendered properly in a variable width font one space is best, but with a monospace font, aka a typewriter font, such as vim uses, some of us cling to two spaces.

Regards, John Little

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Re: Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

Tim Chase
On 2018-08-06 14:47, John Little wrote:
> So, for text to be rendered properly in a variable width font one
> space is best, but with a monospace font, aka a typewriter font,
> such as vim uses, some of us cling to two spaces.

I still use two spaces in my source material particularly because I
can `:set cpo+=J` and Vim will be smart enough to navigate by
sentence even if I have intermediate punctuation that might otherwise
be considered terminal.  E.g.

  I saw Dr. Smith yesterday.  She lives on Oak St. with her husband.

Using ")" and "(" will navigate by true sentences and the "is"/"as"
text-objects refer appropriately to the sentence, not getting tripped
up by the "Dr." and "St." With `cpo-=J`, navigating with ")" and "("
will land on [S]mith and [S]he, and "dis" will only delete a portion
of my sentence.

That said, I usually write in some form of markup (usually HTML but
sometimes Markdown or occasionally LaTeX) and then render them to
HTML or PDF output with whatever the renderer deems an appropriate
amount of inter-sentence spacing---an amount I don't really care
about as long as it looks reasonable. :-)

-tim




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Re: Formatting text and using the convention of putting 2 spaces after a period

Erik Christiansen
On 06.08.18 19:15, Tim Chase wrote:
> I still use two spaces in my source material particularly because I
> can `:set cpo+=J` and Vim will be smart enough to navigate by
> sentence even if I have intermediate punctuation that might otherwise
> be considered terminal.  E.g.
>
>   I saw Dr. Smith yesterday.  She lives on Oak St. with her husband.

Ooh, that would be worth trying - if only I could train myself to insert
two spaces when typing text. After 2^16 trips around our star, that would
be serious finger reprogramming.

...

> That said, I usually write in some form of markup (usually HTML but
> sometimes Markdown or occasionally LaTeX) and then render them to
> HTML or PDF output with whatever the renderer deems an appropriate
> amount of inter-sentence spacing---an amount I don't really care
> about as long as it looks reasonable. :-)

I'll have to find time to dig up an introductory text on minimal LaTeX,
sufficient to add bold / underlined larger-font headings to some Vim
output, in a consumer-friendly font. When I use LibreOffice for that, I
have to make subsequent edits in the GUI monstrosity or lose the
formatting. :-(

On 06.08.18 14:47, John Little wrote:
> My understanding is that in print typesetting, more space was often
> used after a sentence than between words (though it could get
> complicated, depending on the font, the space needed for
> justification, and the first letter of the following sentence).

That is rather interesting. IIRC, not a few early printed books mimicked
the oversized initial capital at the start of a page. That would need
extra space. More generally, if sentence-start double spacing were not
strictly adhered to after initial hand typesetting, the spare space
could serve as a buffer to allow insertion of a missed character earlier
in the line, without risk of wrapping several following lines in a
paragraph. (Laborious by hand.)

Erik

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