Have to type twice to get char

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
14 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Have to type twice to get char

Leonardo Francalanci-2
Sometimes I enter in a "weird" mode where I need to type twice a
character to have it inserted (in the text and in the command line).
This happens only for some chars (l,e,i and some others). "s" typed
twice gives the "beta" character.
I don't know how I enter this mode.
To exit this "mode" I have to restart vim (Esc doesn't work). What is it?

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

c.lina
On Tue, 20 Sep 2005 12:43:24 +0200
Leonardo Francalanci <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Sometimes I enter in a "weird" mode where I need to type twice a
> character to have it inserted (in the text and in the command line).
> This happens only for some chars (l,e,i and some others). "s" typed
> twice gives the "beta" character.
> I don't know how I enter this mode.
> To exit this "mode" I have to restart vim (Esc doesn't work). What is it?
>

Maybe you are entering digraphs?

:he digraphs
:he i_CTRL_K

Regards, Catherine.



--
==================================================
Cras vives? Hodie iam vivere, Postume, serum est.
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

gregory.sacre
In reply to this post by Leonardo Francalanci-2
I don't know, I'm not a Vim expert, but the double s wich corresponds
to a beta seems to have something to do with German. Are your settings
have anything to do with a german or any other languages keyboard?

Or maybe other Vim users will have a better solution :-)

HTH,

Gregory

On 9/20/05, Leonardo Francalanci <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Sometimes I enter in a "weird" mode where I need to type twice a
> character to have it inserted (in the text and in the command line).
> This happens only for some chars (l,e,i and some others). "s" typed
> twice gives the "beta" character.
> I don't know how I enter this mode.
> To exit this "mode" I have to restart vim (Esc doesn't work). What is it?
>
>


--
Alcatel Namur
Software Engineer
Project: O2 Ireland
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

Leonardo Francalanci-2
In reply to this post by c.lina
Yes, I'm entering digraphs! But it's like it's a "mode", it's not on a
character basis! From what I read it should happen for 1 char at a time,
while in my case every thing I type is treated as a digraphs... Is it
normal???


> Maybe you are entering digraphs?
>
> :he digraphs
> :he i_CTRL_K
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

Marian Csontos
On Tue, 20 Sep 2005 14:18:52 +0200, Leonardo Francalanci  
<[hidden email]> wrote:

> Yes, I'm entering digraphs! But it's like it's a "mode", it's not on a  
> character basis! From what I read it should happen for 1 char at a time,  
> while in my case every thing I type is treated as a digraphs... Is it  
> normal???

May be you accidentaly pressed CTRL-^ - it switches your keyboard layout.  
Try pressing it again.
see
:help c_CTRL-^

Regards

-- Marian


________ Information from NOD32 ________
This message was checked by NOD32 Antivirus System for Linux Mail Server.
http://www.nod32.com
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Have to type twice to get char

David Fishburn
In reply to this post by Leonardo Francalanci-2
 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Leonardo Francalanci
> [mailto:[hidden email]]
> Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2005 6:43 AM
> To: [hidden email]
> Subject: Have to type twice to get char
>
> Sometimes I enter in a "weird" mode where I need to type
> twice a character to have it inserted (in the text and in the
> command line).
> This happens only for some chars (l,e,i and some others). "s"
> typed twice gives the "beta" character.
> I don't know how I enter this mode.
> To exit this "mode" I have to restart vim (Esc doesn't work).
> What is it?

If it is digraphs, I have the following in my vimrc:
set nodigraph

Since I never use extended characters, so this works for me.

HTH,
Dave

--
Do you use Vim to edit SQL?
<Plug>
Check the description of these plugins:
dbext.vim - Provides database access to 10 databases (Oracle, Sybase, SQL
Server, MySQL,...) (http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=356)
SQLUtilities - Formatting SQL, generate - columns lists, procedures for
databases (http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=492)
sql.vim - SQL indent file for Sybase ASA and Oracle
(http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=495)
Intellisense for Vim : SQL, C++, CSharp, Java, JSP, XML, HTML
(http://www.vim.org/scripts/script.php?script_id=747)
</Plug>


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

Leonardo Francalanci-2
It's definetely digraph.
Now it starts whenever I open gvim. Commenting either

set nowrap

or

set nowrap

in my vimrc solves the problem...
Why those 2 options together bring me into digraph????

>  
>
>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: Leonardo Francalanci
>>[mailto:[hidden email]]
>>Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2005 6:43 AM
>>To: [hidden email]
>>Subject: Have to type twice to get char
>>
>>Sometimes I enter in a "weird" mode where I need to type
>>twice a character to have it inserted (in the text and in the
>>command line).
>>This happens only for some chars (l,e,i and some others). "s"
>>typed twice gives the "beta" character.
>>I don't know how I enter this mode.
>>To exit this "mode" I have to restart vim (Esc doesn't work).
>>What is it?
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

Charles E Campbell Jr
Leonardo Francalanci wrote:

> It's definetely digraph.
> Now it starts whenever I open gvim. Commenting either
>
> set nowrap
>
> or
>
> set nowrap
>
> in my vimrc solves the problem...
> Why those 2 options together bring me into digraph????

  set nodg
should turn digraphs off.

  :dig
should show you current digraphs.

Entering a digraph is normally done with:
  ctrl-k <char1> <char2>
  -or-
  <char1><bs><char2>


What does
  :verbose set dg?
show?  It should tell you what the setting is and where it was set last.

Does your vim immediately exhibit this digraph behavior, or perhaps
only after you use some plugin?

Regards,
Chip Campbell

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

A.J.Mechelynck
In reply to this post by David Fishburn
----- Original Message -----
From: "David Fishburn" <[hidden email]>
To: "'Leonardo Francalanci'" <[hidden email]>;
<[hidden email]>
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2005 3:11 PM
Subject: RE: Have to type twice to get char


>
>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: Leonardo Francalanci
>> [mailto:[hidden email]]
>> Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2005 6:43 AM
>> To: [hidden email]
>> Subject: Have to type twice to get char
>>
>> Sometimes I enter in a "weird" mode where I need to type
>> twice a character to have it inserted (in the text and in the
>> command line).
>> This happens only for some chars (l,e,i and some others). "s"
>> typed twice gives the "beta" character.
>> I don't know how I enter this mode.
>> To exit this "mode" I have to restart vim (Esc doesn't work).
>> What is it?
>
> If it is digraphs, I have the following in my vimrc:
> set nodigraph
>
> Since I never use extended characters, so this works for me.
>
> HTH,
> Dave

FYI, 'nodigraph', which is the default setting, does not preclude entering
digraphs by the <Ctrl-K><char1><char2> method. What it means is that
<char1><BS><char2> will not be interpreted as a digraph.

But having to type two letters, without prefix or infix, to get one, doesn't
sound like plain-and-simple functioning of the +digraph feature to me,
unless you have a mapping ending in Ctrl-K. It could be a keymap though
(albeit a bizarre one). You might try the following:

1) Is a keymap defined? Is it activated?
    :verbose set keymap? iminsert?

If a keymap is defined but 'iminsert' is set to zero, changing the latter's
value (with Ctrl-_ or anything that maps to that) will toggle the keymap on.
Toggle it again (by Ctrl-_ or by ":set imi=0") to deactivate the keymap. Or
undefine the keymap by ":set keymap= ".
If step 1 shows 'keymap' to be set to the null string, then
2) Is there a mapping that includes <C-K> or ^K ?
    :set nomore
    :redir @"
    :map!
    :redir END
    :set more
    :new
    P
    /<C-K>
    gg
    /^K

where ^K is obtained by hitting Ctrl-V (or Ctrl-Q if you use Ctrl-V to
paste) followed by Ctrl-K

In recent snapshots of Vim 7, at the 3rd line below (2) above you may enter
":verbose map!" instead (without quotes) so the listing produced (and
recalled to a new buffer by P a little farther down) will include
information about where each map was set.

If the results of step 2 are negative, you may have to inspect the list of
mappings visually to look for strange things. Looking for the eszet may help
you, especially in recent versions of Vim 7 if you used ":verbose map!":

    gg
    /?

where ? (which looks somewhat like a Greek beta but is actually a German
eszet) is entered by hitting Ctrl-K s s (without intervening spaces).


Best regards,
Tony.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

RE: Have to type twice to get char

John (Eljay) Love-Jensen
In reply to this post by Leonardo Francalanci-2
Hi everyone,

(somewhat off topic, but related historical footnote)

>..the double s which corresponds to a beta seems to have something to do with
German.

The German "double s", also called "es-zet", or "hard s", or "sharp s",
comes from older print styles where the letter "s" was sometimes elongated,
looking somewhat like a letter f without the cross-bar.

When there were two s next to each other, the practice was to put the "fs"
(imagine the "f" being an elongated s without the cross-bar) with a ligature
between them.

#define UNICODE_ALERT
The German es-zet "ß" has a semblance to the Greek minuscule beta "β", but
the glyphs are different and have a different history.
#undef UNICODE_ALERT

(I'm not sure if the embedded Unicode will be visible.  You may see
garbage.)

Sincerely,
--Eljay

Greek minuscule beta: U+03B2
German es-zet: U+00DF

Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Have to type twice to get char

A.J.Mechelynck
----- Original Message -----
From: "John Love-Jensen" <[hidden email]>
To: <[hidden email]>; "Leonardo Francalanci"
<[hidden email]>
Cc: <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2005 1:34 PM
Subject: RE: Have to type twice to get char


> Hi everyone,
>
> (somewhat off topic, but related historical footnote)
>
>>..the double s which corresponds to a beta seems to have something to do
>>with
> German.
>
> The German "double s", also called "es-zet", or "hard s", or "sharp s",
> comes from older print styles where the letter "s" was sometimes
> elongated,
> looking somewhat like a letter f without the cross-bar.
>
> When there were two s next to each other, the practice was to put the "fs"
> (imagine the "f" being an elongated s without the cross-bar) with a
> ligature
> between them.
>
> #define UNICODE_ALERT
> The German es-zet "??" has a semblance to the Greek minuscule beta "??",
> but
> the glyphs are different and have a different history.
> #undef UNICODE_ALERT
>
> (I'm not sure if the embedded Unicode will be visible.  You may see
> garbage.)

I see eszet and beta allright, and with different glyphs.

>
> Sincerely,
> --Eljay
>
> Greek minuscule beta: U+03B2
> German es-zet: U+00DF

Yes, in "Western" printing fonts for Latin scripts (Roman, Elsevier, etc.).
And it's more complicated than that: there are words with -ss- in the middle
which could not be printed with -??-, even with the recent (and
controversial) spelling reform, which abolished the use of ?? after short
vowels.

Until World War II, the German language used a different font (sometimes
nicknamed Gothic but IIRC the proper name is Fraktur), and a different
handwriting style, where the hard s was formed of an elongated s (extending
farther below the line than above it) followed by a z, also written with a
down-pointing tail (or rather a loop), hence the name es-zet, etymologically
ess-zed (with Z = zed as in ennzed).

A century ago, when uppercasing words containing an ??, the result could be
SZ: my father has an old and beautiful atlas with names like RUSZLAND
(uppercase for Ru??land = Russia), PREUSZEN (Preu??en, Prussia), etc.


Best regards,
Tony.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

[OT]Re: Have to type twice to get char

c.lina
On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 14:49:46 +0200
"Tony Mechelynck" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "John Love-Jensen" <[hidden email]>
> To: <[hidden email]>; "Leonardo Francalanci"
> <[hidden email]>
> Cc: <[hidden email]>
> Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2005 1:34 PM
> Subject: RE: Have to type twice to get char
>
>
> > Hi everyone,
> >
> > (somewhat off topic, but related historical footnote)
> >
> >>..the double s which corresponds to a beta seems to have something to do
> >>with
> > German.
> >
> > The German "double s", also called "es-zet", or "hard s", or "sharp s",
> > comes from older print styles where the letter "s" was sometimes
> > elongated,
> > looking somewhat like a letter f without the cross-bar.
> >
> > When there were two s next to each other, the practice was to put the "fs"
> > (imagine the "f" being an elongated s without the cross-bar) with a
> > ligature
> > between them.
> >
> > #define UNICODE_ALERT
> > but
> > the glyphs are different and have a different history.
> > #undef UNICODE_ALERT
> >
> > (I'm not sure if the embedded Unicode will be visible.  You may see
> > garbage.)
>
> I see eszet and beta allright, and with different glyphs.
>
> >
> > Sincerely,
> > --Eljay
> >
> > Greek minuscule beta: U+03B2
> > German es-zet: U+00DF
>
> Yes, in "Western" printing fonts for Latin scripts (Roman, Elsevier, etc.).
> And it's more complicated than that: there are words with -ss- in the middle
> vowels.

Sorry, what do you mean?

 
> Until World War II, the German language used a different font (sometimes
> nicknamed Gothic but IIRC the proper name is Fraktur),

I think that they did not only use that somewhat hard to read fraktur,
but also the clearer antiqua writing.

> and a different handwriting style,

I am not sure, might be "Suetterlin" hand writing.

> where the hard s was formed of an elongated s (extending
> farther below the line than above it) followed by a z, also written with a
> down-pointing tail (or rather a loop), hence the name es-zet, etymologically
> ess-zed (with Z = zed as in ennzed).
>
> SZ: my father has an old and beautiful atlas with names like RUSZLAND


... now the "eszet" is on the verge of extinction thanks to a
reform of orthography in the Austria, Germany and
Switzerland.
As far as I know, in (the  German speaking part of)
Switzerland the "eszet" is not used at all.

Regards, Catherine.


> Best regards,
> Tony.
>
>
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [OT]Re: Have to type twice to get char

A.J.Mechelynck
----- Original Message -----
From: <[hidden email]>
To: "Tony Mechelynck" <[hidden email]>; <[hidden email]>
Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2005 3:05 PM
Subject: [OT]Re: Have to type twice to get char


> On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 14:49:46 +0200
> "Tony Mechelynck" <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
>> ----- Original Message -----
>> From: "John Love-Jensen" <[hidden email]>
>> To: <[hidden email]>; "Leonardo Francalanci"
>> <[hidden email]>
>> Cc: <[hidden email]>
>> Sent: Wednesday, September 21, 2005 1:34 PM
>> Subject: RE: Have to type twice to get char
>>
>>
>> > Hi everyone,
>> >
>> > (somewhat off topic, but related historical footnote)
>> >
>> >>..the double s which corresponds to a beta seems to have something to
>> >>do
>> >>with
>> > German.
>> >
>> > The German "double s", also called "es-zet", or "hard s", or "sharp s",
>> > comes from older print styles where the letter "s" was sometimes
>> > elongated,
>> > looking somewhat like a letter f without the cross-bar.
>> >
>> > When there were two s next to each other, the practice was to put the
>> > "fs"
>> > (imagine the "f" being an elongated s without the cross-bar) with a
>> > ligature
>> > between them.
>> >
>> > #define UNICODE_ALERT
>> > but
>> > the glyphs are different and have a different history.
>> > #undef UNICODE_ALERT
>> >
>> > (I'm not sure if the embedded Unicode will be visible.  You may see
>> > garbage.)
>>
>> I see eszet and beta allright, and with different glyphs.
>>
>> >
>> > Sincerely,
>> > --Eljay
>> >
>> > Greek minuscule beta: U+03B2
>> > German es-zet: U+00DF
>>
>> Yes, in "Western" printing fonts for Latin scripts (Roman, Elsevier,
>> etc.).
>> And it's more complicated than that: there are words with -ss- in the
>> middle
>> vowels.

Uh? I must have typed wrong. I meant: "there are words with -ss- in the
middle, which weren't written with -?- even outside Switzerland and even
before the recent spelling reform, which eliminated all ? after short
vowels". Apparently one or more lines got lost.

>
> Sorry, what do you mean?
>
>
>> Until World War II, the German language used a different font (sometimes
>> nicknamed Gothic but IIRC the proper name is Fraktur),
>
> I think that they did not only use that somewhat hard to read fraktur,
> but also the clearer antiqua writing.
>
>> and a different handwriting style,
>
> I am not sure, might be "Suetterlin" hand writing.
>
>> where the hard s was formed of an elongated s (extending
>> farther below the line than above it) followed by a z, also written with
>> a
>> down-pointing tail (or rather a loop), hence the name es-zet,
>> etymologically
>> ess-zed (with Z = zed as in ennzed).
>>
>> SZ: my father has an old and beautiful atlas with names like RUSZLAND
>
>
> ... now the "eszet" is on the verge of extinction thanks to a
> reform of orthography in the Austria, Germany and
> Switzerland.
> As far as I know, in (the  German speaking part of)
> Switzerland the "eszet" is not used at all.
>
> Regards, Catherine.
>
>
>> Best regards,
>> Tony.

You're right: an earlier reform suppressed all ? (replacing it by ss) in
Switzerland and Liechtenstein. It may be used for "prettiness" e.g. on a
shopwindow but isn't used in current text in Swiss locales. The recent
reform (not accepted by all newspapers even though it is now supposed to be
"mandatory" in all German-speaking countries except Luxemburg) acknowledges
the fact, and also stipulates that the only "proper" way to capitalise ? is
SS. The "official" spelling for all German-speaking countries except
Switzerland and Liechtenstein still uses ? in some words, but except in
Luxemburg only after long vowels (Luxemburg, which wasn't party to the
treaty, still uses a somewhat "older" spelling with even more frequent ?).

Best regards,
Tony.


Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: [OT]Re: Have to type twice to get char

Emily Jackson
On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 15:35:21 +0200
"Tony Mechelynck" <[hidden email]> wrote:

> You're right: an earlier reform suppressed all ß (replacing it by ss)
> in Switzerland and Liechtenstein. It may be used for "prettiness"
> e.g. on a shopwindow but isn't used in current text in Swiss locales.
> The recent reform (not accepted by all newspapers even though it is
> now supposed to be "mandatory" in all German-speaking countries
> except Luxemburg) acknowledges the fact, and also stipulates that the
> only "proper" way to capitalise ß is SS. The "official" spelling for
> all German-speaking countries except Switzerland and Liechtenstein
> still uses ß in some words, but except in Luxemburg only after long
> vowels (Luxemburg, which wasn't party to the treaty, still uses a
> somewhat "older" spelling with even more frequent ß).

This is interesting; I didn't know the German "sharp s" had fallen out
of favor. When I studied German in high school (US) in the 1970s, our
textbook had not one eszet--everything was double-s ("dass",
"hässlich", etc.) So, I had quite a bit of adjusting to do when I
entered college (university) and studied German there. I guess my high
school textbook was ahead of its time. :-\

Emily

--
"If it seem slow, wait for it; it will surely come, it will not delay."
Emily Jackson
<http://home.hiwaay.net/~emilyj/missjackson.html>