Make it work like a typewriter?

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Make it work like a typewriter?

Tao Joannes
Yo!

I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.

One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft. 

I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount, backups, etc, that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting" mode that will make VIM work like a typewriter.

What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape, basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when opening would be nice, too.

I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard in and appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get kludgy on the scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that made it behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or "revision" mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.

I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember now, so any help to get this working would be greatly appreciated. 

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

bill lam
Assuming you are serious, I suggest notepad would be a better starting
point. At least you don't have to constantly switch between insert and
normal mode.

ymmv

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Tony Mechelynck
In reply to this post by Tao Joannes
On 07/11/10 07:22, Tao Joannes wrote:

> Yo!
>
> I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.
>
> One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the
> temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft.
>
> I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount, backups, etc,
> that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting" mode
> that will make VIM work like a typewriter.
>
> What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between
> insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape,
> basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when
> opening would be nice, too.
>
> I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard in and
> appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get kludgy on
> the scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that made
> it behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or
> "revision" mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.
>
> I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember now, so
> any help to get this working would be greatly appreciated.
>
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> You received this message from the "vim_use" maillist.
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Well, what about

        $r !cat

?   :-P

Please explain what is kludgy about it. Or, for context:

(untested)
        let s:save_more = &more
        set nomore
        %p
        $r !cat
        let &more = s:save_more

(omit the s: prefix (twice) if you type these at the command-line).


Another possibility (also untested) would be
        :set term=dumb

which essentially makes Vim believe that you're displaying on a
teletype-compatible terminal.

Best regards,
Tony.
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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Tom Link-3
In reply to this post by Tao Joannes
> What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between
> insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape,
> basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when opening
> would be nice, too.

Please see here for a starting point:
http://groups.google.com/group/vim_use/browse_frm/thread/b88f5b3acac2aff9/35ab0bbb20d7b531

Regards,
Tom

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Tim Chase
In reply to this post by Tony Mechelynck
On 11/07/10 01:58, Tony Mechelynck wrote:

> On 07/11/10 07:22, Tao Joannes wrote:
>> I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures
>> standard in and appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but
>> that would get kludgy on the scripting, so I'd much rather
>> just have an alternate vimrc that made it behave as
>> specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or
>> "revision" mode, then would select the files by number using
>> a case/select.
>
> Well, what about
>
>    $r !cat

Does this differ any from just using "append" (":help :a") mode?

   :$a

other than that you end it by typing a lone period on the line
instead of with an EOF? (and the cautioned "lines-beginning with
a backslash", though if Tao is writing a novel, I expect this is
less of a concern...I can't think of many novels I've read that
contain back-slashes unless you're also including markup)

-tim



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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Christian Brabandt
In reply to this post by Tao Joannes
On Sun, November 7, 2010 7:22 am, Tao Joannes wrote:

> Yo!
>
> I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.
>
> One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the
> temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft.
>
> I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount, backups, etc,
> that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting" mode that
> will make VIM work like a typewriter.
>
> What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between
> insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape,
> basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when opening
> would be nice, too.
>
> I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard in and
> appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get kludgy on the
> scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that made it
> behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or "revision"
> mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.
>
> I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember now, so
> any
> help to get this working would be greatly appreciated.

As a really simple way, would evim help you?

regards,
Christian

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Tao Joannes

On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 5:50 AM, Christian Brabandt <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Sun, November 7, 2010 7:22 am, Tao Joannes wrote:
> Yo!
>
> I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.
>
> One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the
> temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft.
>
> I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount, backups, etc,
> that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting" mode that
> will make VIM work like a typewriter.
>
> What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between
> insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape,
> basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when opening
> would be nice, too.
>
> I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard in and
> appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get kludgy on the
> scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that made it
> behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or "revision"
> mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.
>
> I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember now, so
> any
> help to get this working would be greatly appreciated.

As a really simple way, would evim help you?

regards,
Christian


Thanks for the input, haven't had time to test them all out.

Let me be clear though, I'm not having trouble using vim, lol, I used to teach a class on the subject.

I'm just trying to figure out a way to limit functionality in a specific way that would prevent me from going back and changing what I've written, as a piece of paper in a typewriter would function.

The idea would be to force a forward, forward, always forward sort of flow to my writing and keep me from second-guessing myself during drafting. 

evim and notepad just aren't what I'm looking for, they would take away all the good parts of vim without eliminating the basic problem, the ability to go back and change things. 

They've got all kinds of neat writing software for other OS's, I'm just trying to mimic some of their functionality with a script-based VI frontend.

But it looks like cat is gonna be the way to go. 

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Andrei Kulakov
On 11/08/2010 04:56 PM, Tao Joannes wrote:

>
> On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 5:50 AM, Christian Brabandt <[hidden email]
> <mailto:[hidden email]>> wrote:
>
>     On Sun, November 7, 2010 7:22 am, Tao Joannes wrote:
>      > Yo!
>      >
>      > I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.
>      >
>      > One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the
>      > temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft.
>      >
>      > I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount,
>     backups, etc,
>      > that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting"
>     mode that
>      > will make VIM work like a typewriter.
>      >
>      > What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching
>     between
>      > insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and
>     escape,
>      > basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when
>     opening
>      > would be nice, too.
>      >
>      > I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard
>     in and
>      > appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get
>     kludgy on the
>      > scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that
>     made it
>      > behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or
>     "revision"
>      > mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.
>      >
>      > I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember
>     now, so
>      > any
>      > help to get this working would be greatly appreciated.
>
>     As a really simple way, would evim help you?
>
>     regards,
>     Christian
>
>
> Thanks for the input, haven't had time to test them all out.
>
> Let me be clear though, I'm not having trouble using vim, lol, I used to
> teach a class on the subject.
>
> I'm just trying to figure out a way to limit functionality in a specific
> way that would prevent me from going back and changing what I've
> written, as a piece of paper in a typewriter would function.
>
> The idea would be to force a forward, forward, always forward sort of
> flow to my writing and keep me from second-guessing myself during drafting.
>
> evim and notepad just aren't what I'm looking for, they would take away
> all the good parts of vim without eliminating the basic problem, the
> ability to go back and change things.
>
> They've got all kinds of neat writing software for other OS's, I'm just
> trying to mimic some of their functionality with a script-based VI frontend.
>
> But it looks like cat is gonna be the way to go.

Why not remap the bs, left, up, esc keys to <Nop> ? There's ways to get
around that but I think it should be good enough for your purposes. Cool
question, though. By the way, you might even want to do something a bit
more complicated, like a script that allows you backspace up to 5 chars
or so but then you have to type 10+ chars until you're allowed to
backspace again, so that at least you can fix typos. -ak

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RE: Make it work like a typewriter?

Steve Hall-3
In reply to this post by Tao Joannes
From: Tao Joannes, Mon, November 08, 2010 4:56 pm
[...]
> I'm just trying to figure out a way to limit functionality in a
> specific way that would prevent me from going back and changing what
> I've written, as a piece of paper in a typewriter would function.

Why not just unmap all the Del, Backspace, and upward navigation keys?
I guess the point is not to actually disable using the command line,
just to break habits of navigating upward.

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

George V. Reilly
In reply to this post by Tao Joannes
On Sat, Nov 6, 2010 at 11:22 PM, Tao Joannes <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.

One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft. 

I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount, backups, etc, that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting" mode that will make VIM work like a typewriter.

What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape, basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when opening would be nice, too.

I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard in and appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get kludgy on the scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that made it behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or "revision" mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.

I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember now, so any help to get this working would be greatly appreciated. 


http://www.google.com/search?q=vim+writeroom returns several hits that may be of interest. I can't vouch for any of them.
-- 
/George V. Reilly  [hidden email]  Twitter: @georgevreilly
http://www.georgevreilly.com/blog  http://blogs.cozi.com/tech

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

Tao Joannes
On Mon, Nov 8, 2010 at 5:51 PM, George V. Reilly <[hidden email]> wrote:
On Sat, Nov 6, 2010 at 11:22 PM, Tao Joannes <[hidden email]> wrote:
I'm using vim to write a novel, and lots of other short stories, etc.

One problem I always have is that I find it difficult to resist the temptation to go back and edit while I'm doing the initial draft. 

I've got a script that handles file management, wordcount, backups, etc, that's working pretty well, and I'd like to work in a "drafting" mode that will make VIM work like a typewriter.

What I mean is that the navigation is gone, except for switching between insert and command mode.  All I want is type, space, enter, and escape, basically, having it go automatically to the end of the file when opening would be nice, too.

I know I could do it with a 'cat' command that captures standard in and appends it to whatever file I'm editing, but that would get kludgy on the scripting, so I'd much rather just have an alternate vimrc that made it behave as specified. I'd have a toggle setting for "draft" or "revision" mode, then would select the files by number using a case/select.

I've forgotten more about vi commands, etc, than I can remember now, so any help to get this working would be greatly appreciated. 


http://www.google.com/search?q=vim+writeroom returns several hits that may be of interest. I can't vouch for any of them.

Writeroom looks pretty cool, and pretty easy to emulate, lol.

I actually took the map to <nop> suggestion, and mapped j,k,l,h,<bs><up><down><left><right> to <nop> and mapped i to GA, worked a little ModeToggle function into the script, and made DRAFT mode the default. 

It's pretty badass actually. 

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Re: Make it work like a typewriter?

John Matthewman
On 11/9/10, Tao Joannes <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Writeroom looks pretty cool, and pretty easy to emulate, lol.

You could also take a look at WordGrinder: http://wordgrinder.sourceforge.net/

But if you've got things working the way you like with vim then you
might as well stick with it and get your writing done! ;)

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