colorscheme 16-bit

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colorscheme 16-bit

trialero
Hi,

There are lot of great Vim colorschemes out there, but beware to use
one in a plain tty console -- it looks like nothing. Recently I adopted
switching relative and absolute line numbers, and that is where coloring
is important. In console most of us probably use a more basic
colorscheme, avoiding all the soft focus and tones that won't
display anyway.

Although most colorschemes in eg. vimcolors.org have a button to select
`Term' savvy schemes, almost all of them are 256 colors and not the 8 or
max 16 colors you have in a decent tty console. `Term' isn't the same as
a plain console without GUI.

This afternoon I did the following (to end frustration ;-):

1. download the colorscheme you like most, and put it in ~/.vim/colors/
Open the file in your preferred editor, and use it with `:color <myscheme>'

2. look for the lines with the parts that most annoy you in console. For
me it was LineNr, Comment and CursorLineNr. The first two where too dark
and the last one I wanted yellow instead of white (nighted.vim
scheme);

3. change the value of `ctermfg' to a 16-bit value that actually works.
Leave the rest that is fine; Search the Net for a `256colors2.pl' Perl
file that gives your console color numbers (top row 0-7, bottom row
8-15);

4. save (as) the changed colorscheme under the same name with eg. `_16b' on
the end to mark your changes;

5. test your adapted colorscheme with `:color <myscheme>_16b' and
evaluate your changes. Don't forget to change the naming of the
colorscheme in the top lines of the <myscheme>_16b.vim file: `let
g:colors_name = <newname_with_16b>'. This is improtant for proper
working in your `vimrc';

6. if it works, just add your `_16b' scheme to your .vimrc.

For me it works!

Happy Easter Weekend!

//meine

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Re: colorscheme 16-bit

Salman Halim
I always worry that some day there will be a newer version of a color scheme file and I'll lose fancy new colours this way. My solution is to create a custom file (such as mysolarized.vim) and source the original in there and just change the name and replace those colors that I want changed. 

I've gone pretty far with this and have a mycommon.vim and mycommonlight.vim and mycommondark.vim that I source from all my versions, the latter two depending on the value of &background.

--

Salman

On Fri, Apr 19, 2019, 14:52 meine <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi,

There are lot of great Vim colorschemes out there, but beware to use
one in a plain tty console -- it looks like nothing. Recently I adopted
switching relative and absolute line numbers, and that is where coloring
is important. In console most of us probably use a more basic
colorscheme, avoiding all the soft focus and tones that won't
display anyway.

Although most colorschemes in eg. vimcolors.org have a button to select
`Term' savvy schemes, almost all of them are 256 colors and not the 8 or
max 16 colors you have in a decent tty console. `Term' isn't the same as
a plain console without GUI.

This afternoon I did the following (to end frustration ;-):

1. download the colorscheme you like most, and put it in ~/.vim/colors/
Open the file in your preferred editor, and use it with `:color <myscheme>'

2. look for the lines with the parts that most annoy you in console. For
me it was LineNr, Comment and CursorLineNr. The first two where too dark
and the last one I wanted yellow instead of white (nighted.vim
scheme);

3. change the value of `ctermfg' to a 16-bit value that actually works.
Leave the rest that is fine; Search the Net for a `256colors2.pl' Perl
file that gives your console color numbers (top row 0-7, bottom row
8-15);

4. save (as) the changed colorscheme under the same name with eg. `_16b' on
the end to mark your changes;

5. test your adapted colorscheme with `:color <myscheme>_16b' and
evaluate your changes. Don't forget to change the naming of the
colorscheme in the top lines of the <myscheme>_16b.vim file: `let
g:colors_name = <newname_with_16b>'. This is improtant for proper
working in your `vimrc';

6. if it works, just add your `_16b' scheme to your .vimrc.

For me it works!

Happy Easter Weekend!

//meine

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Re: colorscheme 16-bit

Frank Shute
In reply to this post by trialero
Here's a nickel, kid. Get yourself a better console:

https://www.freebsd.org/cgi/man.cgi?query=vt&apropos=0&sektion=4&manpath=FreeBSD+12.0-RELEASE+and+Ports&arch=default&format=html

;-)

On Fri, 19 Apr 2019 at 19:52, meine <[hidden email]> wrote:

>
> Hi,
>
> There are lot of great Vim colorschemes out there, but beware to use
> one in a plain tty console -- it looks like nothing. Recently I adopted
> switching relative and absolute line numbers, and that is where coloring
> is important. In console most of us probably use a more basic
> colorscheme, avoiding all the soft focus and tones that won't
> display anyway.
>
> Although most colorschemes in eg. vimcolors.org have a button to select
> `Term' savvy schemes, almost all of them are 256 colors and not the 8 or
> max 16 colors you have in a decent tty console. `Term' isn't the same as
> a plain console without GUI.
>
> This afternoon I did the following (to end frustration ;-):
>
> 1. download the colorscheme you like most, and put it in ~/.vim/colors/
> Open the file in your preferred editor, and use it with `:color <myscheme>'
>
> 2. look for the lines with the parts that most annoy you in console. For
> me it was LineNr, Comment and CursorLineNr. The first two where too dark
> and the last one I wanted yellow instead of white (nighted.vim
> scheme);
>
> 3. change the value of `ctermfg' to a 16-bit value that actually works.
> Leave the rest that is fine; Search the Net for a `256colors2.pl' Perl
> file that gives your console color numbers (top row 0-7, bottom row
> 8-15);
>
> 4. save (as) the changed colorscheme under the same name with eg. `_16b' on
> the end to mark your changes;
>
> 5. test your adapted colorscheme with `:color <myscheme>_16b' and
> evaluate your changes. Don't forget to change the naming of the
> colorscheme in the top lines of the <myscheme>_16b.vim file: `let
> g:colors_name = <newname_with_16b>'. This is improtant for proper
> working in your `vimrc';
>
> 6. if it works, just add your `_16b' scheme to your .vimrc.
>
> For me it works!
>
> Happy Easter Weekend!
>
> //meine
>
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Frank

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Re: colorscheme 16-bit

Tony Mechelynck
The problem is that too many colorschemes these days are not
cterm-conscious: they assume that you have a lot of colours at your
disposal and sometimes even that you are using gvim — and yet, Vim, as
an editor, is still extremely useful for some tasks that have to be
done with no GUI interface; one of these tasks would be rescuing a
failed software upgrade, where you can't rely on a functioning X11
server: then you are left with the "bare bones" console which usually
has only 8 background and 16 foreground colors, and uses the cterm=
ctermbg= ctermfg= settings of the :hi command, not the gui= guibg=
guifg= guisp= settings. Another such task would be tweaking settings
on a server where no X11 package is installed (and usually no screen
or keyboard either but the sysadmin added them for the occasion).

IMHO Vim's default colors are quite good, though not perfect (nothing
is perfect) for both cterm and gui (I haven't had the occasion to test
the term= colors for lack of the necessary monochrome-terminal
hardware in the days since I've known Vim) so I use an owncoded
colorscheme which defines only what I regard as insufficient in the
default colors (and no shame on Bram: de coloribus non est
disputandum). When running Console Vim in a terminal which is capable
of 256 colors (such as konsole or xterm) I supplement this colorscheme
(which you'll find attached; feel free to use it or not, and if you
do, to adapt it to your own use case; if you want to try it, its home
is in ~/.vim/colors on a Unix-like system, or in ~/vimfiles/colors on
a Windows system) with the CSApprox plugin (available at vim.org), so
in that case I get the same colors, or as close as possible and almost
indistinguishable to my eye, in Vim in konsole or xterm and in gvim.
(I wrote that colorscheme before the 'termguicolors' option was
available and this way I don't depend on the +termguicolors feature
being compiled-in.) Of course, in the 8/16 bare-bones console (where
CSApprox detects that &t_Co < 88 and disables itself) the colors are
very different but at least they are distinct.

Best regards,
Tony.

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Re: colorscheme 16-bit

trialero
In reply to this post by trialero
On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 08:52:29PM +0200, meine wrote:
> on how to adapt a vim colorscheme to 16-bits color

Thank all for your replies and reading!

@Salman: you have an interesting option to keep up with developments!

@Frank: TNX for the nickel! My main box has a Nvidia card and I chose
not to use it and stick with the basic `sh' terminal in FreeBSD 12.
Tried the `fish' shell but that didn't give me extra colors, so I'll
have to stick with the basic 16-bits of colors...

@Tony: TNX for your extensive reply! IMHO vim is not only for rescueing
your system. I preferrably use vim in a tty console, because working in
that environment skips all the nuisance and distraction my X11
environment has -- no temptation to get a quick view of mastodon,
twitter or the headlines. When in GUI, I still prefer using vim in an xterm
window, but when I double-click a file in the XFE file manager gvim does
the job.

Have a nice Easter Weekend,

BFN

//meine

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