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unicode

Zura Kutchava
To:



 Dear friends

finding and trying everything that supports unicode in gvim in windows xp or 2003. No fonts, no digraphs, no countless encodings help to display
unicode symbols from 10d0 to 10f0 (georgian)

may be somebody have any idea?

i little programming in c/c++ so if it will be good i can try to help

thanks beforehand

zkutch

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Re: unicode

Yasuhiro MATSUMOTO-2
Do you mean that "How to write unicode without input method" ?
Then, One of solution is "<c-r>=nr2char(0x10d0)". However nr2char depend on &encoding. So you can use following utility function.

---------------
function! s:nr2byte(nr)
  if a:nr < 0x80
    return nr2char(a:nr)
  elseif a:nr < 0x800
    return nr2char(a:nr/64+192).nr2char(a:nr%64+128)
  elseif a:nr < 0x10000
    return nr2char(a:nr/4096%16+224).nr2char(a:nr/64%64+128).nr2char(a:nr%64+128)
  elseif a:nr < 0x200000
    return nr2char(a:nr/262144%16+240).nr2char(a:nr/4096/16+128).nr2char(a:nr/64%64+128).nr2char(a:nr%64+128)
  elseif a:nr < 0x4000000
    return nr2char(a:nr/16777216%16+248).nr2char(a:nr/262144%16+128).nr2char(a:nr/4096/16+128).nr2char(a:nr/64%64+128).nr2char(a:nr%64+128)
  else
    return nr2char(a:nr/1073741824%16+252).nr2char(a:nr/16777216%16+128).nr2char(a:nr/262144%16+128).nr2char(a:nr/4096/16+128).nr2char(a:nr/64%64+128).nr2char(a:nr%64+128)
  endif
endfunction

function! encutil#nr2enc_char(charcode)
  if &encoding == 'utf-8'
    return nr2char(a:charcode)
  endif
  let char = s:nr2byte(a:charcode)
  if strlen(char) > 1
    let char = strtrans(iconv(char, 'utf-8', &encoding))
  endif
  return char
endfunction
--------------- 

<c-r>=encutil#nr2enc_char(0x10d0)

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Re: unicode

Alexandru Pănoiu
In reply to this post by Zura Kutchava
Use DejaVu fonts, they are free and have Georgian characters (http://dejavu-fonts.org/).

:set guifont=DejaVu_Sans_Mono
:set enc=utf-8

All the best,

AlexP
On Thu, Jan 5, 2012 at 12:01 AM, Zura Kutchava <[hidden email]> wrote:
To:



 Dear friends

finding and trying everything that supports unicode in gvim in windows xp or 2003. No fonts, no digraphs, no countless encodings help to display
unicode symbols from 10d0 to 10f0 (georgian)

may be somebody have any idea?

i little programming in c/c++ so if it will be good i can try to help

thanks beforehand

zkutch

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Re: unicode

Tony Mechelynck
In reply to this post by Zura Kutchava
On 04/01/12 23:01, Zura Kutchava wrote:

> To:
>
>
>
>   Dear friends
>
> finding and trying everything that supports unicode in gvim in windows xp or 2003. No fonts, no digraphs, no countless encodings help to display
> unicode symbols from 10d0 to 10f0 (georgian)
>
> may be somebody have any idea?
>
> i little programming in c/c++ so if it will be good i can try to help
>
> thanks beforehand
>
> zkutch
>

About fonts in gvim, see
        http://vim.wikia.com/Setting_the_font_in_the_GUI
On Windows, the command
        :set gfn=*
allows you to choose a font by a menu. It's been too long since I've
left Windows to remember, but maybe the display on the bottom of that
dialog is actually an input area, where you can paste any text (e.g.
Georgian text) from the clipboard and see how it would be displayed in
that font.

About using Unicode in Vim (in General), see
        http://vim.wikia.com/Working_with_Unicode

To input Georgian characters, you can:
- use a keymap (and create your own if there is no satisfactory one), see
        :help 'keymap'
        :help keymap-file-format

- use digraphs (and create your own if there are no satisfactory ones)
see
        :help :digraph

- and if nothing else avails, you can always use the method described under
        :help i_CTRL-V_digit


Best regards,
Tony.
--
ARTHUR: Right! Knights! Forward!
    ARTHUR leads a charge toward the castle.  Various shots of them
battling on,
    despite being hit by a variety of farm animals.
                  "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON (MONTY)
PICTURES LTD

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Re: unicode

Zura Kutchava
thanks everybody for comprehensive answers

i find very simply solution

when i install gvim 7.3.386 then i can type Georgian(from 10d0 to 10f0) in input mode without more changes. _gvimrc is same for both.

but when install gvim 7.3.42 Georgian is seen only in digraph method

i dont deeg deeply, maybe experts can see reason easy, i'll be gratefull for explantion




--- On Sat, 1/7/12, Tony Mechelynck <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Tony Mechelynck <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: unicode
> To: [hidden email]
> Cc: "Zura Kutchava" <[hidden email]>, [hidden email], [hidden email]
> Date: Saturday, January 7, 2012, 11:42 AM
> On 04/01/12 23:01, Zura Kutchava
> wrote:
> > To:
> >
> >
> >
> >   Dear friends
> >
> > finding and trying everything that supports unicode in
> gvim in windows xp or 2003. No fonts, no digraphs, no
> countless encodings help to display
> > unicode symbols from 10d0 to 10f0 (georgian)
> >
> > may be somebody have any idea?
> >
> > i little programming in c/c++ so if it will be good i
> can try to help
> >
> > thanks beforehand
> >
> > zkutch
> >
>
> About fonts in gvim, see
>     http://vim.wikia.com/Setting_the_font_in_the_GUI
> On Windows, the command
>     :set gfn=*
> allows you to choose a font by a menu. It's been too long
> since I've left Windows to remember, but maybe the display
> on the bottom of that dialog is actually an input area,
> where you can paste any text (e.g. Georgian text) from the
> clipboard and see how it would be displayed in that font.
>
> About using Unicode in Vim (in General), see
>     http://vim.wikia.com/Working_with_Unicode
>
> To input Georgian characters, you can:
> - use a keymap (and create your own if there is no
> satisfactory one), see
>     :help 'keymap'
>     :help keymap-file-format
>
> - use digraphs (and create your own if there are no
> satisfactory ones)
> see
>     :help :digraph
>
> - and if nothing else avails, you can always use the method
> described under
>     :help i_CTRL-V_digit
>
>
> Best regards,
> Tony.
> -- ARTHUR: Right! Knights! Forward!
>    ARTHUR leads a charge toward the
> castle.  Various shots of them battling on,
>    despite being hit by a variety of farm
> animals.
>              
>    "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON
> (MONTY) PICTURES LTD
>
> -- You received this message from the "vim_multibyte"
> maillist.
> For more information, visit http://www.vim.org/maillist.php
>

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Re: unicode

Tony Mechelynck
On 08/01/12 11:13, Zura Kutchava wrote:
> thanks everybody for comprehensive answers
>
> i find very simply solution
>
> when i install gvim 7.3.386 then i can type Georgian(from 10d0 to 10f0) in input mode without more changes. _gvimrc is same for both.
>
> but when install gvim 7.3.42 Georgian is seen only in digraph method
>
> i dont deeg deeply, maybe experts can see reason easy, i'll be gratefull for explantion

Well, maybe tou'll find something "interesting" between the lines
7.3.042 (excluded) and 7.3.386 (included) in
ftp://ftp.vim.org/pub/vim/patches/7.3/README

Best regards,
Tony.
--
O give me a home,
Where the buffalo roam,
Where the deer and the antelope play,
Where seldom is heard
A discouraging word,
'Cause what can an antelope say?

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Re: unicode for Georgian

krbeesley
In reply to this post by Tony Mechelynck
> To input Georgian characters, you can:
> - use a keymap (and create your own if there is no satisfactory one), see
> :help 'keymap'
> :help keymap-file-format


zkutch,

RE:  gvim, Unicode, Georgian mxedruli

Here's how I have implemented Georgian mxedruli in gvim.  Corrections and suggestions
would be welcome.

For displaying Georgian mxedruli, the DejaVu Sans Mono font has the glyphs (and is a good
general Unicode mono font, suitable for gvim).    You will have to install this font (or a similar
Unicode mono font) on Windows wherever you install fonts so that they are visible to gvim.

                Keymap

I assume here that you want to use a keymap, which allows you to type Roman letters,
and simple sequences (bigraphs, trigraphs, etc.) of Roman letters on your keyboard.  These
are intercepted by the keymap and turned into mxedruli characters before being entered
into the buffer.  You type an unambiguous Roman _transliteration_ of mxedruli, so the keymap
(below) is titled mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim.  This mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim file should be
installed in your ~/.vim/keymap/ directory (or the equivalent for Windows).

Key points:
        1.  You have to tell gvim to use DejaVu Sans Mono (or another Unicode-encoded
                mono font that contains the mxedruli glyphs).
        2.  You want gvim to store/encode text internally in utf-8 (a default encoding of Unicode)
        3.  You want gvim to save buffers to file in utf-8 and read files in utf-8
        4.  You want easy ways to activate and de-activate the mxedruli keymap when you type
You do this via commands in your .gvimrc file.


I'm not a Windows user, but something close to the following should work for you.

In your .gvimrc file, add the lines:

if has ("multi_byte")      " i.e. compiled for multi_byte, needed for Unicode
  if &encoding !~? '^u'    " if encoding does not start u or U
    if &termencoding=='' " don't clobber keyboard locale
      let &termencoding=&encoding
    endif
    set encoding=utf-8  " how vim should represent text internally
  endif
  " fileencodings, tried in order when opening an existing file
  set fileencodings=ucs-bom,utf-8,iso-8859-1
  setglobal bomb
  " fileencoding is the encoding vim will use to write files
  setglobal fileencoding=utf-8
else
  echomsg 'Warning: Multibyte support not compiled in.'
endif

set anti guifont="DejaVu Sans Mono:h14

" input sequences to activate the mxedruli keymap
nmap ,m       :setlocal keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>
imap ,m  <Esc>:setlocal keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>a

" toggle keymaps (to previous and back) N.B. <C-^> works only in Insert mode
"   and in command-line mode
nmap ,.  i<C-^><Esc>
imap ,.   <C-^>
cmap ,.   <C-^>

" return to the neutral keymap
nmap ,, :setlocal keymap="neutral"<Enter>
imap ,, <Esc>:setlocal keymap="neutral"<Enter>a

" end of additions to .gvimrc

Put the mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim file (below) in your ~/.vim/keymap/  directory
(or equivalent for Windows).

" mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim
"
" Maintainer:  Kenneth R. Beesley  krbeesley ATT gmail DOTT com
" Created: 2008-09-21
" Last Changed: 2012-01-09

" vim keymap (input method) for entering Georgian mxedruli

" Installation:  place this file in ~/.vim/keymap/

" Selection inside gvim
" :setlocal keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8
"
" or, in your .gvimrc file, include the commands
" nmap ,m       :setlocal keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>
" imap ,m  <Esc>:setlocal keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>a
"
" nmap ,.  i<C-^><Esc>
" imap ,.   <C-^>
" cmap ,.   <C-^>

" nmap ,, :setlocal keymap="neutral"<Enter>
" imap ,, <Esc>:setlocal keymap="neutral"<Enter>a
"
" so that you can activate the mxedruli input method by typing  ,m
" toggle back and forth by typing  ,.
" and return to the "neutral" keymap by typing ,,

" **************************************************************

" this short name is for display in the status line
let b:keymap_name="mxedruli-translit"

" change the lCursor color (the color when this keymap is active)
highlight lCursor guifg=NONE guibg=Cyan

loadkeymap

a <Char-0x10D0>
b <Char-0x10D1>
g <Char-0x10D2>
d <Char-0x10D3>
e <Char-0x10D4>
v <Char-0x10D5>
z <Char-0x10D6>
t <Char-0x10D7>
i <Char-0x10D8>
k' <Char-0x10D9>
l <Char-0x10DA>
m <Char-0x10DB>
n <Char-0x10DC>
o <Char-0x10DD>
p' <Char-0x10DE>
Z <Char-0x10DF>
r <Char-0x10E0>
s <Char-0x10E1>
t' <Char-0x10E2>
u <Char-0x10E3>
p <Char-0x10E4>
k <Char-0x10E5>
G <Char-0x10E6>

q' <Char-0x10E7>
q <Char-0x10E7>   " no q vs. q' distinction

S <Char-0x10E8>
tS <Char-0x10E9>
ts <Char-0x10EA>
dz <Char-0x10EB>
ts' <Char-0x10EC>
tS' <Char-0x10ED>

x <Char-0x10EE>
X <Char-0x10EE> " x and X the same

dZ <Char-0x10EF>
h <Char-0x10F0>

" literalize with preceding backslash
" (seldom needed)

\p <Char-0x10E4>
\t <Char-0x10D7>
\k <Char-0x10E5>
\d <Char-0x10D3>
\s <Char-0x10E1>
\S <Char-0x10E8>
\z <Char-0x10D6>
\Z <Char-0x10DF>
\' '


" literalize the backslash itself
\\ \

" end of mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim

With this setup, when you launch gvim, you just need to type

,m

i.e. a comma followed immediately by an m, to activate the
mxedruli keymap.  While this mode is active, you just type
a, e, i, o and u to enter the obvious vowels, and (as far as
possible) you type the obvious Roman equivalents for the
consonants.  Ejectives are entered with a roman consonant
followed by a single quote: e.g. p', t', k'.  See the keymap
above for other mapping details.

See
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_alphabet
for the Unicode code point values.

You can of course modify the keymap to your taste by changing
the input sequences on the left side, as long as each input sequence is unique.

To toggle between the mxedruli keymap and the previous
keymap, just type   ,.    (i.e. comma followed immediately by
a period).

To return to the default/normal keymap, just type
,,
i.e. two commas together.


Good luck,

Ken

On 7Jan2012, at 00:42, Tony Mechelynck wrote:

> On 04/01/12 23:01, Zura Kutchava wrote:
>> To:
>>
>>
>>
>>  Dear friends
>>
>> finding and trying everything that supports unicode in gvim in windows xp or 2003. No fonts, no digraphs, no countless encodings help to display
>> unicode symbols from 10d0 to 10f0 (georgian)
>>
>> may be somebody have any idea?
>>
>> i little programming in c/c++ so if it will be good i can try to help
>>
>> thanks beforehand
>>
>> zkutch
>>
>
> About fonts in gvim, see
> http://vim.wikia.com/Setting_the_font_in_the_GUI
> On Windows, the command
> :set gfn=*
> allows you to choose a font by a menu. It's been too long since I've left Windows to remember, but maybe the display on the bottom of that dialog is actually an input area, where you can paste any text (e.g. Georgian text) from the clipboard and see how it would be displayed in that font.
>
> About using Unicode in Vim (in General), see
> http://vim.wikia.com/Working_with_Unicode
>
> To input Georgian characters, you can:
> - use a keymap (and create your own if there is no satisfactory one), see
> :help 'keymap'
> :help keymap-file-format
>
> - use digraphs (and create your own if there are no satisfactory ones)
> see
> :help :digraph
>
> - and if nothing else avails, you can always use the method described under
> :help i_CTRL-V_digit
>
>
> Best regards,
> Tony.
> --
> ARTHUR: Right! Knights! Forward!
>   ARTHUR leads a charge toward the castle.  Various shots of them battling on,
>   despite being hit by a variety of farm animals.
>                 "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON (MONTY) PICTURES LTD
>
> --
> You received this message from the "vim_multibyte" maillist.
> For more information, visit http://www.vim.org/maillist.php


******************************
Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
P.O. Box 540475
North Salt Lake, UT
84054  USA





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Re: unicode for Georgian

Zura Kutchava
Thanks a lot

i check your keymap and setting and, of course, it works for gvim73-46

i also changed keymap (put in attachment) to coincide it with windows georgian keyboard, for that people who use georgian keyboard in windows. It came from old (befor computers) georgian printing press keyboard. So for 73-46 users everything is ready.

the good side of this keyboard is that it's possible to type one key for one georgian letter. Hope it will be usefull for georgian keyboard users.

let me repeat that most easy is install gvim-7-3-386 and in it directly switch keyboard layots

zkutch





--- On Mon, 1/9/12, Kenneth Reid Beesley <[hidden email]> wrote:

> From: Kenneth Reid Beesley <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: unicode for Georgian
> To: [hidden email]
> Date: Monday, January 9, 2012, 10:57 PM
> > To input Georgian characters,
> you can:
> > - use a keymap (and create your own if there is no
> satisfactory one), see
> >     :help 'keymap'
> >     :help keymap-file-format
>
>
> zkutch,
>
> RE:  gvim, Unicode, Georgian mxedruli
>
> Here's how I have implemented Georgian mxedruli in
> gvim.  Corrections and suggestions
> would be welcome.
>
> For displaying Georgian mxedruli, the DejaVu Sans Mono font
> has the glyphs (and is a good
> general Unicode mono font, suitable for gvim).   
> You will have to install this font (or a similar
> Unicode mono font) on Windows wherever you install fonts so
> that they are visible to gvim.
>
>         Keymap
>
> I assume here that you want to use a keymap, which allows
> you to type Roman letters,
> and simple sequences (bigraphs, trigraphs, etc.) of Roman
> letters on your keyboard.  These
> are intercepted by the keymap and turned into mxedruli
> characters before being entered
> into the buffer.  You type an unambiguous Roman
> _transliteration_ of mxedruli, so the keymap
> (below) is titled mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim.  This
> mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim file should be
> installed in your ~/.vim/keymap/ directory (or the
> equivalent for Windows).
>
> Key points:
>     1.  You have to tell gvim to use
> DejaVu Sans Mono (or another Unicode-encoded
>         mono font that
> contains the mxedruli glyphs).
>     2.  You want gvim to store/encode
> text internally in utf-8 (a default encoding of Unicode)
>     3.  You want gvim to save buffers
> to file in utf-8 and read files in utf-8
>     4.  You want easy ways to activate
> and de-activate the mxedruli keymap when you type
> You do this via commands in your .gvimrc file.
>
>
> I'm not a Windows user, but something close to the
> following should work for you.
>
> In your .gvimrc file, add the lines:
>
> if has ("multi_byte")      " i.e. compiled
> for multi_byte, needed for Unicode
>   if &encoding !~? '^u'    " if encoding
> does not start u or U
>     if &termencoding==''    "
> don't clobber keyboard locale
>       let &termencoding=&encoding
>     endif
>     set encoding=utf-8  " how vim should
> represent text internally
>   endif
>   " fileencodings, tried in order when opening an
> existing file
>   set fileencodings=ucs-bom,utf-8,iso-8859-1
>   setglobal bomb
>   " fileencoding is the encoding vim will use to write
> files
>   setglobal fileencoding=utf-8
> else
>   echomsg 'Warning: Multibyte support not compiled
> in.'
> endif
>
> set anti guifont="DejaVu Sans Mono:h14
>
> " input sequences to activate the mxedruli keymap
> nmap ,m       :setlocal
> keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>
> imap ,m  <Esc>:setlocal
> keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>a
>
> " toggle keymaps (to previous and back) N.B. <C-^>
> works only in Insert mode
> "   and in command-line mode
> nmap ,.  i<C-^><Esc>
> imap ,.   <C-^>
> cmap ,.   <C-^>
>
> " return to the neutral keymap
> nmap ,,   
>      :setlocal
> keymap="neutral"<Enter>
> imap ,, <Esc>:setlocal
> keymap="neutral"<Enter>a
>
> " end of additions to .gvimrc
>
> Put the mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim file (below) in your
> ~/.vim/keymap/  directory
> (or equivalent for Windows).
>
> " mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim
> "
> " Maintainer:  Kenneth R. Beesley  krbeesley ATT
> gmail DOTT com
> " Created: 2008-09-21
> " Last Changed: 2012-01-09
>
> " vim keymap (input method) for entering Georgian mxedruli
>
> " Installation:  place this file in ~/.vim/keymap/
>
> " Selection inside gvim
> " :setlocal keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8
> "
> " or, in your .gvimrc file, include the commands
> " nmap ,m       :setlocal
> keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>
> " imap ,m  <Esc>:setlocal
> keymap=mxedruli-translit_utf-8<Enter>a
> "
> " nmap ,.  i<C-^><Esc>
> " imap ,.   <C-^>
> " cmap ,.   <C-^>
>
> " nmap ,,   
>      :setlocal
> keymap="neutral"<Enter>
> " imap ,, <Esc>:setlocal
> keymap="neutral"<Enter>a
> "
> " so that you can activate the mxedruli input method by
> typing  ,m
> " toggle back and forth by typing  ,.
> " and return to the "neutral" keymap by typing ,,
>
> "
> **************************************************************
>
> " this short name is for display in the status line
> let b:keymap_name="mxedruli-translit"
>
> " change the lCursor color (the color when this keymap is
> active)
> highlight lCursor guifg=NONE guibg=Cyan
>
> loadkeymap
>
> a    <Char-0x10D0>
> b    <Char-0x10D1>
> g    <Char-0x10D2>
> d    <Char-0x10D3>
> e    <Char-0x10D4>
> v    <Char-0x10D5>
> z    <Char-0x10D6>
> t    <Char-0x10D7>
> i    <Char-0x10D8>
> k'    <Char-0x10D9>
> l    <Char-0x10DA>
> m    <Char-0x10DB>
> n    <Char-0x10DC>
> o    <Char-0x10DD>
> p'    <Char-0x10DE>
> Z    <Char-0x10DF>
> r    <Char-0x10E0>
> s    <Char-0x10E1>
> t'    <Char-0x10E2>
> u    <Char-0x10E3>
> p    <Char-0x10E4>
> k    <Char-0x10E5>
> G    <Char-0x10E6>
>
> q'    <Char-0x10E7>
> q    <Char-0x10E7>   "
> no q vs. q' distinction
>
> S    <Char-0x10E8>
> tS    <Char-0x10E9>
> ts    <Char-0x10EA>
> dz    <Char-0x10EB>
> ts'    <Char-0x10EC>
> tS'    <Char-0x10ED>
>
> x    <Char-0x10EE>
> X    <Char-0x10EE>    "
> x and X the same
>
> dZ    <Char-0x10EF>
> h    <Char-0x10F0>
>
> " literalize with preceding backslash
> " (seldom needed)
>
> \p    <Char-0x10E4>
> \t    <Char-0x10D7>
> \k    <Char-0x10E5>
> \d    <Char-0x10D3>
> \s    <Char-0x10E1>
> \S    <Char-0x10E8>
> \z    <Char-0x10D6>
> \Z    <Char-0x10DF>
> \'    '
>
>
> " literalize the backslash itself
> \\ \
>
> " end of mxedruli-translit_utf-8.vim
>
> With this setup, when you launch gvim, you just need to
> type
>
> ,m
>
> i.e. a comma followed immediately by an m, to activate the
> mxedruli keymap.  While this mode is active, you just
> type
> a, e, i, o and u to enter the obvious vowels, and (as far
> as
> possible) you type the obvious Roman equivalents for the
> consonants.  Ejectives are entered with a roman
> consonant
> followed by a single quote: e.g. p', t', k'.  See the
> keymap
> above for other mapping details.
>
> See
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_alphabet
> for the Unicode code point values.
>
> You can of course modify the keymap to your taste by
> changing
> the input sequences on the left side, as long as each input
> sequence is unique.
>
> To toggle between the mxedruli keymap and the previous
> keymap, just type   ,.    (i.e.
> comma followed immediately by
> a period).
>
> To return to the default/normal keymap, just type
> ,,
> i.e. two commas together.
>
>
> Good luck,
>
> Ken
>
> On 7Jan2012, at 00:42, Tony Mechelynck wrote:
>
> > On 04/01/12 23:01, Zura Kutchava wrote:
> >> To:
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >>  Dear friends
> >>
> >> finding and trying everything that supports
> unicode in gvim in windows xp or 2003. No fonts, no
> digraphs, no countless encodings help to display
> >> unicode symbols from 10d0 to 10f0 (georgian)
> >>
> >> may be somebody have any idea?
> >>
> >> i little programming in c/c++ so if it will be
> good i can try to help
> >>
> >> thanks beforehand
> >>
> >> zkutch
> >>
> >
> > About fonts in gvim, see
> >     http://vim.wikia.com/Setting_the_font_in_the_GUI
> > On Windows, the command
> >     :set gfn=*
> > allows you to choose a font by a menu. It's been too
> long since I've left Windows to remember, but maybe the
> display on the bottom of that dialog is actually an input
> area, where you can paste any text (e.g. Georgian text) from
> the clipboard and see how it would be displayed in that
> font.
> >
> > About using Unicode in Vim (in General), see
> >     http://vim.wikia.com/Working_with_Unicode
> >
> > To input Georgian characters, you can:
> > - use a keymap (and create your own if there is no
> satisfactory one), see
> >     :help 'keymap'
> >     :help keymap-file-format
> >
> > - use digraphs (and create your own if there are no
> satisfactory ones)
> > see
> >     :help :digraph
> >
> > - and if nothing else avails, you can always use the
> method described under
> >     :help i_CTRL-V_digit
> >
> >
> > Best regards,
> > Tony.
> > --
> > ARTHUR: Right! Knights! Forward!
> >   ARTHUR leads a charge toward the
> castle.  Various shots of them battling on,
> >   despite being hit by a variety of
> farm animals.
> >             
>    "Monty Python and the Holy Grail" PYTHON
> (MONTY) PICTURES LTD
> >
> > --
> > You received this message from the "vim_multibyte"
> maillist.
> > For more information, visit http://www.vim.org/maillist.php
>
>
> ******************************
> Kenneth R. Beesley, D.Phil.
> P.O. Box 540475
> North Salt Lake, UT
> 84054  USA
>
>
>
>
>
> --
> You received this message from the "vim_multibyte"
> maillist.
> For more information, visit http://www.vim.org/maillist.php
>
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