what is the origin

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Re: what is the origin

Mikołaj Machowski
Dnia środa, 8 lutego 2006 17:50, A. J. Mechelynck napisał:
> ... and for those of us who don't anymore have "museum" keyboards (see
> later replies), here are the mnemonic tricks I use:

usr_02.txt:

For Japanese users, Hiroshi Iwatani suggested using this:

                        Komsomolsk
                            ^
                            |
           Huan Ho <--- --->  Los Angeles
        (Yellow river)    |
                            v
                          Java (the island, not the programming language)

m.

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Re: :find with autocompletion?

Hari Krishna Dara
In reply to this post by Carlos Beltran

On Wed, 8 Feb 2006 at 5:32pm, Carlos Beltran wrote:

>
> Hello,
>
> I was wondering if the :find command to search for files can be improved to
> include autocompletion of the filename. I usually work with hundreds of
> files and can not remember the exact name of all of them, thus :find is most
> of the time of no use at all. Is there a way to find files with name
> autocompletion and with "ignorecase" capability??
>
> Thanks,
>
> Carlos.

I have this in my vimrc and use it all the time, it depends on the
presence of genutils.vim and multvals.vim plugins

command! -nargs=* -bang -complete=custom,<SID>PathComplete FindInPath
      \ :find<bang> <args>
function! s:PathComplete(ArgLead, CmdLine, CursorPos)
  return UserFileComplete(a:ArgLead, a:CmdLine, a:CursorPos, 1, &path)
endfunction

You just have to use FindInPath command instead of find. You can
of course call it Find too, but I had this command for another purpose
already. It should be possible to enhance the UserFileComplete()
function to even consider 'ignorecase' option.

--
HTH,
Hari

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Re: what is the origin

A.J.Mechelynck
In reply to this post by Mikołaj Machowski
Mikolaj Machowski wrote:

> Dnia środa, 8 lutego 2006 17:50, A. J. Mechelynck napisał:
>> ... and for those of us who don't anymore have "museum" keyboards (see
>> later replies), here are the mnemonic tricks I use:
>
> usr_02.txt:
>
> For Japanese users, Hiroshi Iwatani suggested using this:
>
> Komsomolsk
>    ^
>    |
>   Huan Ho <--- --->  Los Angeles
> (Yellow river)    |
>    v
>  Java (the island, not the programming language)
>
> m.
>
>
>
>

:-)

Komsomolsk or Kamchatka?

Best regards,
Tony.

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Re: what is the origin

Matthew Winn
In reply to this post by Gene Kwiecinski
On Wed, Feb 08, 2006 at 12:44:26PM -0500, Gene Kwiecinski wrote:
> >I remember using an ADM-3A with an overly bright tube.  You could feel
> >it bleaching your eyeballs as you used it.  And there was one bit of
> kit
>
> ??  Didn't they have that dinky little brightness control either as a
> knobbed pot towards the top-right(?) of the keyboard, else the
> thumbwheel-thingy along the bottom edge?

Broken.

> Running joke around the 'puter center waaay back when was to sneak up on
> someone typing on a '3A, crank the brightness pot alllll the way up 'til
> the letters would get all bright and fuzzy and the displayed area of the
> screen would shrink at least a half-inch, then whisper to the person,
> "Go sterile... go sterile...".

Ah, yes, the good old days, when terminals fogged photographic film and
made operators glow in the dark.

Returning to the history of vi, the 1980 manual by Bill Joy and Mark
Horton says:

    A small set of operators, like d for delete and c for change,
    are combined with the motion commands to form operations such
    as delete word or change paragraph, in a simple and natural way.
    This regularity and the mnemonic assignment of commands to keys
    makes the editor command set easy to remember and use.

Interesting comments about an editor that's often accused of being too
difficult to learn because of its obscure and unintuitive commands.

The manual also goes on to point out that the vi command set works on
hardcopy terminals, storage tubes and glass ttys, so vi's command set
is available on all terminals.  Match that, emacs.

--
Matthew Winn ([hidden email])
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Re: what is the origin

Mikołaj Machowski
In reply to this post by A.J.Mechelynck
Dnia czwartek, 9 lutego 2006 01:40, A. J. Mechelynck napisał:
> :-)
>
> Komsomolsk or Kamchatka?
>

Copied verbatim: Komsomolsk.

m.

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Re: what is the origin

linda.s
what is Komsomolsk? curious:)

On 2/9/06, Mikolaj Machowski <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Dnia czwartek, 9 lutego 2006 01:40, A. J. Mechelynck napisał:
> > :-)
> >
> > Komsomolsk or Kamchatka?
> >
>
> Copied verbatim: Komsomolsk.
>
> m.
>
>
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Re: what is the origin

Yakov Lerner
"linda.s" <[hidden email]> said:
> what is Komsomolsk? curious:)
>
City in the Far East Russia, on the river Amur,
full name Komsomolsk-Na-Amure (Komsomolsk on Amur).
--
 
  [hidden email]

--
http://www.fastmail.fm - Does exactly what it says on the tin

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RE: what is the origin

Gene Kwiecinski
In reply to this post by linda.s
>>??  Didn't they have that dinky little brightness control either as a
>>knobbed pot towards the top-right(?) of the keyboard, else the
>>thumbwheel-thingy along the bottom edge?

>Broken.

Ah, that could do it...


>>Running joke around the 'puter center waaay back when was to sneak up
on
>>someone typing on a '3A, crank the brightness pot alllll the way up
'til
>>the letters would get all bright and fuzzy and the displayed area of
the
>>screen would shrink at least a half-inch, then whisper to the person,
>>"Go sterile... go sterile...".

>Ah, yes, the good old days, when terminals fogged photographic film and
>made operators glow in the dark.

...and heat up your lunch, too!


>Returning to the history of vi, the 1980 manual by Bill Joy and Mark
>Horton says:

>    A small set of operators, like d for delete and c for change,
>    are combined with the motion commands to form operations such
>    as delete word or change paragraph, in a simple and natural way.
>    This regularity and the mnemonic assignment of commands to keys
>    makes the editor command set easy to remember and use.

>Interesting comments about an editor that's often accused of being too
>difficult to learn because of its obscure and unintuitive commands.

They have a harder time grokking "modes", it seems.  Just "demoed" the
difference when a Perl programmer came over and wanted to edit a script,
taking out one link from a long path.  His way, ride the arrow keys down
and over to the spot, then ride the <del> key 'til it's all gone.  My
way, "/post<cr>2dwZZ" and it's done in seconds.  I win.


>The manual also goes on to point out that the vi command set works on
>hardcopy terminals, storage tubes and glass ttys, so vi's command set
>is available on all terminals.  Match that, emacs.

Hell, on my vintage 1988 DOS box I could route the console i/o through
the serial port, *and* edit the scripts through 'vi' (PC/VI, a real port
of AT&T Unix 'vi' that even would cause a complaint by DOS about the
'-i' option when dropping down into a shell ('sh -i', get it?),
heh-heh), all this done on a TV910 dumb terminal when the DOS box was 2
floors above.  Try that with *any* editor other'n maybe DOS's 'edlin'!
<shudder>
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